Month: February 2018

Immigrants Detained By The Government Not Entitled To Bond Hearings

Under immigration law, applicants for admission to the United States may be detained by the Government until certain proceedings have concluded. Nothing in the applicable statutes limit the duration of detention, nor mention bond hearings. In Jennings v. Rodriguez, an immigrant filed a habeas corpus suit arguing that he should be entitled to a bond hearing once his detention... Read More >

Court Narrows Bankruptcy Safe Harbor Provision

In Merit Management Group, LP v. FTI Consulting, Inc., the Court addressed 11 U.S.C. sec. 548(e), which allows bankruptcy trustees to set aside and recover certain transfers for the benefit of the bankruptcy estate, but not a “settlement payment . . . made by or to (or for the benefit of) a . . . financial institution . ... Read More >

Key Provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Acts

By:  Nancy Ortmeyer Kuhn, Esq. The “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” or “TCJA” is the new tax law effective for tax years beginning January 1, 2018 or later.  TCJA has many interconnected parts and it is not yet completely clear how some of these parts will co-exist to impact certain taxpayers.  Already, many questions have arisen regarding interpretation of terms and... Read More >

Southern District Heightens Lawyers’ Duties in Preventing Spoliation of Evidence by Clients

In Industrial Quick Search, Inc. et al. v. Miller, Rosado & Algois, LLP et al., January 2, 2018, the Southern District of New York issued a decision underscoring the importance of lawyers paying early attention to the need for imposing “litigation holds,” being proactive in ensuring compliance with such holds, and making a clear record of steps taken with... Read More >